Using Your Blog as a Tool for Follow-Up Contact

Who do you write your blog for? For most lawyers, past clients and referral partners make up a large portion of their subscribers. So use that as a tool for follow-up contact with those who know your business best. Continue reading

Schedule Your Social Media Posts and Take a Load Off Your Mind

I finally did it! I’ve been saying that Legal Linguist needed a Twitter feed for over a year now. This week, I bit the bullet. Why did I wait? Because I wanted to do it right. Then I learned about a great way to schedule my social media posts. It takes a load off my mind and lets me plan ahead to make a better first (tenth? hundredth?) impression. Continue reading

Lawyers Shouldn’t Blog Every Day

There. I said it. Lawyers shouldn’t blog every day. This may go against conventional wisdom for building better SEO rankings, but in reality, most lawyers who try to blog every day will not help their reputations very much. Continue reading

Drip Marketing: Not Just a Drop in the Bucket

When you get hit with one drop of water, it’s easy to ignore. But as I am writing this blog, a torrent of drops are pouring down outside my office. It’s enough to make me take notice (even without a window). The same is true with email marketing. One impression won’t drive much traffic, but a constant drip marketing strategy will bring clients to your door. Continue reading

Is Your LinkedIn Profile Working for You?

You probably still have a LinkedIn profile active from the last time you did a job search. Maybe you even get friend requests from time to time. But are you actually using your LinkedIn profile to build your business?

A LinkedIn profile is almost part of the college curriculum these days. Job seekers build one to give them access to the platform’s jobs database and the endless recruiters trolling (badly) for new blood. But what happens after they get the job or, better yet, start their own business? How can job-havers use LinkedIn to build their reputation and their following?

Update Your LinkedIn Profile

If the last time you logged in to LinkedIn was just before you interviewed for your current job, then you have some work to do. Your business connections will want to know where you ended up and what you are doing now. Make sure to keep your profile up to date by adding job responsibilities, big wins, and memberships and associations as they come along.

Update Your Headshot

None of us look like we did in college. Hairstyles change, clothing goes out of style, and faces age over time. Rather than ignoring your maturity, embrace it. Take a new professional headshot at least once every few years, and add it to your LinkedIn profile page. That way the people you met at last week’s networking event who are looking for a woman with short brown hair and glasses won’t skip over you because in college your hair was long and dyed blonde. Don’t be ashamed of your age! An up to date profile photo will make it easier for connections to find you and will express your experience in your field.

Add New Connections

When you get back from that networking event, you will probably have a stack of new business cards. Rather than throwing them in a drawer, run the names through LinkedIn. By connecting with people you have met you will remind them of what you do (in far more detail than on a business card). Not only that, the list of experience and accomplishments that you’ve kept updated is sure to impress them and increase the chance they refer to you in the future.

Publish Content

How do you keep a connection coming back to you once you have made the connection? Set up your blog to push regular updates to LinkedIn. Re-using your web content this way will help build your reputation as an expert in your field, and will keep bringing your connections back to see what you are doing now.

LinkedIn can be a great source for professional referrals. Because the people there are already looking to do business, your connections will see you as a colleague first, rather than a friend. The people who browse Linked In are often looking for someone who provides services. By keeping an updated profile you can make the right first impression and get more calls leading to more closed business.

Lisa Schmidt is a writer for Legal Linguist. She helps attorneys and small businesses create a robust online marketing strategy that focuses on recruiting referral partners and hooking potential clients. If you need someone to give your web content new life, contact Legal Linguist today to arrange a meeting.

Using a Downloadable to Build Reputation

Do you have a flier that you hand to your clients? Are there certain questions potential clients always ask? Using a convenient downloadable on your website and social media outlets can give your readers something to take away and build your reputation. Continue reading

Is There Such A Thing As Too Many Webpages?

You have spent a lot of time and money building up your web presence, particularly a professional website. Now your marketing manager wants to add pages for every aspect of your practice. So when is enough enough? Continue reading

Facebook Changes: Bad for Small Businesses

For years you have been hearing about building a Facebook business page for marketing purposes. But some behind the scenes changes are making Facebook tougher for small businesses. Continue reading

A New Year’s Resolution: Keep Social Media Personal

There aren’t many people who choose to send New Year’s Eve alone. That’s because the holidays are social events – times to connect with family and friends and strengthen old bonds. So why do so many businesses treat social media networks so much differently?

Far too many business owners treat their follows on social media like the the masses at professional networking events – they collect as many contacts as they can, but never do any follow up. But social media is about relationships.

On its most basic level, social media is one of several ways for business owners to keep in contact with past and potential clients and referral sources. And it can be a platform for publicizing new blogs and news items. But if you stop there, you may as well be using mailers.

Instead, small business owners need to commit to making personal connections with their social media followers. That means engaging with them and giving them a glimpse at the man behind the curtain. So, in 2015, business owners should resolve to:

Reply to Followers

Inevitably, someone will comment on one of your posts. In fact, you want them to. That’s how you can develop organic reach for your social media posts. Thank new followers, like or favorite responses and shares and retweets. And engage in your followers’ conversations. It will build brand loyalty and grow organic reach.

Be Personal

In between blog posts and product photos, take the time to post something personal. That doesn’t mean posting a picture of your lunch, but maybe you could post a shot of you and the crew on the job. Let them see who you are and what they are paying for behind the marketing pitch. It will help your loyal fans recommend you better to their contacts.

Have Conversations

Particularly on Twitter, one of the best ways to improve visibility and teach your followers about your business is to have conversations with them. Consider asking open-ended questions and being prepared to respond to the answers. Or set up a Tweet-chat or “Ask Me Anything” – dedicated times when you will engage and respond to your followers’ questions.

2015 will give you a chance for a whole new take on your social media strategy. Make a New Year’s resolution to take it more personally and to engage with your followers. What you invest in time, you will get back in organic growth and dedicated followers. If you need help developing a social media strategy, contact blogging coach Lisa Schmidt at Legal Linguist today.

 

Skipping Christmas?

You blog regularly. You publish on a set schedule designed to reach your target audience. And now that schedule is telling you to post on Christmas. What do you do?

Let’s face it, very few people will be scrolling through their RSS or social media feeds on Christmas or New Year’s morning, looking for a thought-provoking article on business or the law. So how do you deal with the scheduling conflict. There are a few options.

Post with Christmas Cheer!

If you are a stickler for schedules, you could decide to post anyway. People often may not find your blog until the next day, but you can show your dedication to consistency. If you are going to post on December 25 (or January 1 or any other holiday, for that matter), be sure to acknowledge what you are doing. Don’t just put up a generic “top tips” post because, let’s face it, you’re phoning it in while your kids open up their stockings to Rudolph the Red Nosed Reindeer. Instead, craft a blog that is in the holiday spirit. There are very few topics that can’t be connected to Christmas or New Year’s Resolutions or at least year end. Let your readers know that you are paying attention rather than just posting for the sake of posting.

Dodge Christmas

Your readers may be busy on Christmas morning, but they probably will have some down time on Christmas Eve or the day after the holiday. Adjusting your schedule so your post goes out just before or just after a holiday can be a good idea, particularly if you are targeting consumers. You may still want to use a holiday theme, but people probably won’t fault you for a fall-back post either. Instead they will be thanking you for giving them something to read to avoid unwanted in-laws.

Skip the Post

Every business (except possibly emergency rooms) has some holidays when they are closed. Despite the importance of new and fresh content, your readers won’t lynch you because your office, and your blog, are closed for the holidays. The more often you blog, the less likely skipping Christmas will negatively affect your SEO. So relax and enjoy the egg nog, knowing you’ll jump right back into blogging in the new year.

Which holiday strategy is best for you depends largely on how often you post and who your target market is. Ask yourself whether your readers will be at their desks or whether they may want a distraction. Then decide whether to target, dodge, or skip this holiday season.

Lisa Schmidt is a ghostblogger and blogging coach for Legal Linguist. She helps small businesses and law firms create professional web content and improve their online marketing return on investment. If you need help giving your website a boost in the New Year, contact Legal Linguist today.